PAST EXHIBITS

Art of the Sea Turtle!

September 6-28, 2019

 

Eastern Shore Art Center invites the community to engage in creativity and conservation as we celebrate TURTLES! Guests will enjoy interactive booths, art exhibits, art projects, and grab bags.  From Red Bellies and Gophers to Loggerheads and Leatherbacks, turtles are taking over ESAC!

 

Our exhibit features work from over 40 regional artists in the Whiting Gallery!

Vanda McCormick

“Observations From A Barnyard”

August 2 – 31, 2019

 

This exhibit is a colorful and joyful observance of goats in a barnyard.  In abstracted style, I have tried to imply the attitudes of goats as they climb trees, speak to each other in “goat speak,” or just as they gaze at the viewer.

 

Wildlife and nature are major inspirations for my paintings and artwork.  I’ve been told that I am a colorist, which influences my art as well.  Having a background and degree in graphic design, I love the inherent beauty defined by simple black and white imagery, also.

 

As a retired Art Teacher of 25 years, I want to show beauty in my work, but I also want to allow the viewer to take their own journey through my work and hopefully come to an appreciation for the work shown.

Susan Fitzsimmons

“Obstacles and Walls”

August 2 – September 25, 2019

 

These sculptural works done over several years reflect my abiding interest in finding new methods for old materials, and the importance of looking at a real three-dimensional object to capture our attention for more than a moment.

 

For me, poetry is the language of sculpture-it alludes, examines, has substance, and reflects reality back to us in subtle ways. The poems of Robert Frost caught my attention for this show, and his words seem particularly relevant today. “Mending Wall” is an often-repeated poem in today’s discussion of border walls.

 

“There where it is we do not need the wall:
He is all pine and I am apple orchard.
My apple trees will never get across
And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him.
He only says, “Good fences make good neighbours.”

 

The nine sculptures Sentinels and Guardians were completed while I lived on the border in Texas. The issue of global migration is affecting societies throughout the world as climate and violence change the world. Migration has always been part of human DNA because we evolved from hunter and gatherers, following the herd. Borders and defense of territory only came about as mankind became an agrarian society, with a hierarchical social structure, and property. Images of Sentinels and Guardians are seen throughout art history, on the ruins of city gates, churches, and palaces. The record of failed societies reminds us, that one thing is sure; there is no one simple solution.

 

Frost’s poem of love, passion and hate, Fire And Ice, has double meaning for us as we face the effects of global warming.

 

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.

 

We all encounter obstacles and walls in our search for purpose. Like the old saying, what doesn’t kill you will make you stronger. When we overcome obstacles our goal seems even more valuable. I hope you will find poetry and your own meaning in these works. Thank you for your contemplation and gift of looking.

Martha Markline Hopkins

“Light and Shadow”

August 2 – September 28, 2019

 

Leo Tolstoy said, “All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow.” What is dark, what was hidden, what needs to be revealed? This exploration of light and shadow shows real and alternative realities, where objects are emphasized or subverted, and investigates the many layers that surround our traditional sense of the real. My dreams are brought to light from the dark.

Steven Lester

“Spirit of a Champion”

August 2 – 31, 2019

 

Gallery Talk with Steven Lester: August 3rd @ 11am.

Free admission! Refreshments provided. 

 

Growing up in Atlanta, Steven always had an enthusiasm for sports and while taking art in school, he was commissioned to illustrate a series of GameDay program covers for Georgia Tech football. After graduating from Georgia State University with a degree in Visual Arts, he began his career as a commercial illustrator and soon became the Creative Director of Turner Broadcasting System.  Because this was during the years Ted Turner owned the Atlanta Braves and the Atlanta Hawks, Steven was able to meet a number of the players and became a fascinated fan.

 

By this time, he had already cultivated a love for action-oriented sports art. But his fast-track creative design and advertising career allowed little time for painting. He soon became a highly successful Vice President, Creative Director for two international advertising agencies, winning more than 100 national and international awards.

 

When Steven and his wife adopted 2 children, he found himself traveling and becoming a conflicted, absentee father. After considerable deliberation, he made a conscious career change, resigning from the advertising agency to attend seminary. For the next 20 years, he pastored churches and pioneered numerous, creative ministry and missions initiatives. He also began focusing his creative skills advancing causes and issues that are of value to him. He had the privilege of traveling the world and making life-long friends from Russia to India to Africa. But again, he had very little time for cultivating a passion for drawing and painting.

 

After 4 decades of focusing on other priorities and beginning to lean toward retirement, Steven purposed to spend the next 3 years honing his fine art craft. Five years later, he has now joyfully shifted his focus and fully embraced his love of painting.

Vanda McCormick

“Observations From A Barnyard”

August 2 – 31, 2019

 

This exhibit is a colorful and joyful observance of goats in a barnyard.  In abstracted style, I have tried to imply the attitudes of goats as they climb trees, speak to each other in “goat speak,” or just as they gaze at the viewer.

 

Wildlife and nature are major inspirations for my paintings and artwork.  I’ve been told that I am a colorist, which influences my art as well.  Having a background and degree in graphic design, I love the inherent beauty defined by simple black and white imagery, also.

 

As a retired Art Teacher of 25 years, I want to show beauty in my work, but I also want to allow the viewer to take their own journey through my work and hopefully come to an appreciation for the work shown.

Susan Fitzsimmons

“Obstacles and Walls”

August 2 – September 25, 2019

 

These sculptural works done over several years reflect my abiding interest in finding new methods for old materials, and the importance of looking at a real three-dimensional object to capture our attention for more than a moment.

 

For me, poetry is the language of sculpture-it alludes, examines, has substance, and reflects reality back to us in subtle ways. The poems of Robert Frost caught my attention for this show, and his words seem particularly relevant today. “Mending Wall” is an often-repeated poem in today’s discussion of border walls.

 

“There where it is we do not need the wall:
He is all pine and I am apple orchard.
My apple trees will never get across
And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him.
He only says, “Good fences make good neighbours.”

 

The nine sculptures Sentinels and Guardians were completed while I lived on the border in Texas. The issue of global migration is affecting societies throughout the world as climate and violence change the world. Migration has always been part of human DNA because we evolved from hunter and gatherers, following the herd. Borders and defense of territory only came about as mankind became an agrarian society, with a hierarchical social structure, and property. Images of Sentinels and Guardians are seen throughout art history, on the ruins of city gates, churches, and palaces. The record of failed societies reminds us, that one thing is sure; there is no one simple solution.

 

Frost’s poem of love, passion and hate, Fire And Ice, has double meaning for us as we face the effects of global warming.

 

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.

 

We all encounter obstacles and walls in our search for purpose. Like the old saying, what doesn’t kill you will make you stronger. When we overcome obstacles our goal seems even more valuable. I hope you will find poetry and your own meaning in these works. Thank you for your contemplation and gift of looking.

Martha Markline Hopkins

“Light and Shadow”

August 2 – September 28, 2019

 

Leo Tolstoy said, “All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow.” What is dark, what was hidden, what needs to be revealed? This exploration of light and shadow shows real and alternative realities, where objects are emphasized or subverted, and investigates the many layers that surround our traditional sense of the real. My dreams are brought to light from the dark.

NALL

“Alice in Wonderland” Series

June 7 – July 27, 2019

 

Artist Statement

 

In 1975, I was given a copy of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass which I read, re-read, and read again.

 

Two years later, the idea to illustrate ‘Alice’ matured into an attempt to unravel the mysteries and joys of Lewis Carroll’s tale, to search for the keys to unlock the many doors of his mind.

 

I traveled to many countries during these three years searching for the proper heads of friends to pose as characters, and drew them as they were.  This was a wonderful time in my life, coming to terms with myself as an artist and as a man. “Alice” was an ingredient, a psycho-analytical tool that grew me up.

 

A trip to Oxford, England, the Lewis Carroll Library, where the head librarian, president of the Lewis Carroll Society, confirmed theories and erased doubts concerning Carroll’s life.  He was the son of a preacher, one of eleven children, a bachelor, an accomplished photographer, a mathematician and wine taster for the school.  He adored costumes and the theatre, and his passion for little girls melted when they reached puberty.

 

A growing esteem for Lewis Carroll urged me to unveil the Victorian restraints and allow a post-hippie culture to applaud his nakedness, to look directly into the eyes of this man who mirrors our own fantasies and secret passions, and who was brave enough, wise enough, to write them down.

 

He enchants us as children, defines us as adults; and, in truth, lets us mingle with the Gods.

 

Nall

Monte-Carlo, 1996

Carol Thompson

“Ode to Impressionism” Quilted Artworks

June 7 – July 27, 2019

 

“I started quilting when I retired, about 20 years ago. I made lots of quilts and gave them to friends and family and others who just seemed to need them. I had lots of fun with colors and patterns, until one of my sisters told me that everybody had enough of my quilts! She thought I should try making art quilts based on the works of famous impressionists. She suggested I  try to replicate brush strokes with small pieces instead of cutting fabric into the exact shapes of objects. So I experimented again and again and finally made her a quilt copying a Van Gogh painting of olive trees. In those experiments, I found that the smallest piece I could include was about 1/2 inch by 1/2 inch. Now, most pieces in my work are about 1/2 inch by 1 inch. My quilt paintings end up to include about 2,000 to 4,000 pieces.

 

I soon found making “regular” quilts to be boring. Occasionally, I make a lap quilt or table runner in between working on another art work. I love bringing a copy of the painting that I’ve chosen to the fabric store and choosing the fabric. Figuring out how much fabric to buy is a challenge because only about half to two thirds of the fabric is on the front, the rest is used up in the seams.

 

I mainly “copy” Impressionist landscapes because I love the way the artists use color and I enjoy trying to figure out how to replicate their colors. I choose the paintings that make me smile. The quilt “format” makes them a bit comforting as well. I hope that they make people feel good and smile as they view my work.”

Art Study Club of Pensacola

June 7 – July 27, 2019

 

An organization that brings together a group of persons interested in the visual arts for sharing of educational programs and exhibition activities. Images coming soon!

Watercolor & Graphic Arts Society of Mobile

May 3 – 31, 2019

 

The Watercolor & Graphic Arts Society is probably the oldest arts organization in Mobile and one of the oldest in the state of Alabama. The Society began as an outgrowth of the celebrated Bayou Painters group on June 5, 1948. It was then known as the “Watercolor Society of Mobile” and was open to artists throughout Alabama. There were originally twenty-two members including Genevieve Southerland, Edmond deCelle, William Bush, and the late Bea Q. Tucker. Since then, many well known and well respected artists have become members. Records indicate that the graphic arts addition began in 1954. Today there are nearly one hundred members.

 

As a non-profit organization, the object of the Society is to create, through education, more interest in the media of watercolor and graphic arts, and to promote finer watercolor and graphic arts exhibitions by Alabama artists. The Society holds a minimum of two exhibitions annually, at least one of which is always juried.

 

Membership

Only artists working in watercolor and/or graphic arts are considered for membership. To be eligible, a person must be living in the Mobile, Alabama area or vicinity at the time of invitation, and must be duly invited as a guest exhibitor. Criteria for nomination and selection for membership are demonstrated by professional interest and technical ability.

 

The Society is very selective. Two active members must nominate possible members in writing eight weeks before the Member Show. Nominees are then formally invited to join and are asked to submit a resume. Each prospective member must present two pieces in the Society’s Membership Exhibit. Current active members choose new members by written ballot. Those who are not chosen are encouraged to reapply, since fierce competition in particular years can exclude talented artists.

 

www.wgasmobile.org

“At The Water’s Edge”

Abstract Landscape Paintings by Wm. Coleman Mills

April 5 – June 1, 2019

 

Preferring the title “painter”over that of “artist”, Wm. Coleman Mills’ work is an exploration of mnemonics. In his own words, Mills is far more interested in “the memory of a place, with its’ inherent inaccuracies and overlays of emotions, than a photographic recollection”. An avid outdoorsman, Mills draws inspiration from hours spent in the broomsedge fields, pinoak forests, saltmarshes and grassflats of the American South. He combines the saturated colors and organic forms of this natural world with the regulating lines of his architectural education to create richly textured compositions deeply imbedded with memory and place. His paintings often catalog flyfishing excursions to the Florida Keys and barrier islands of the Gulf of Mexico. Mills’ work has been exhibited at the State Museum of Alabama, in solo and group shows and is held in private and corporate collections throughout the United States.

 

A native of Fairhope, Wm. Coleman Mills is educated as an architect. He has undergraduate and graduate degrees in architecture from Auburn, Cornell and Harvard and has studied and trained under AIA Gold Medalists Samuel Mockbee and Michael Graves. Mills’ formal training in oil painting came at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, where he earned his Master of Design Studies in Architectural History and Theory. He has lived, worked and studied on the East Coast, Europe and Mexico and returned home to Alabama nine years ago. He lives in Fairhope, with his wife Alix and three young children Georgia, Rosie and Gus.

“Creating What We Love”

Artists by the Bay

April 5 – June 1, 2019

 

Artists by the Bay was founded by Dianne Daniell and Brenda Anderson over 15 years ago. They so enjoyed taking art classes together and spending time with other creative and ‘arty’ people, that they wanted to create a venue where artists (both hobby and professional), artist wanna-bes, art appreciators, and art enthusiasts could come together to enjoy, be inspired by, and support each other.

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